Business Aircraft Ops to Mongolia – Part 2: Permits

> | May 8, 2017 | 0 Comments
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Business Aircraft Ops to Mongolia – Part 2: Permits
This business aviation blog post continues from our article last week, entitled “Business Aircraft Ops to Mongolia – Part 1: Operating Tips.

For business aircraft operators planning to fly to or over Mongolia it’s important to be mindful that required routings and flight information regions (FIRs) are integral to landing and overflight permits. This can cause issues if, for example, your approved routings and FIRs from China and Mongolia do not line up. In such cases careful revisions are needed to ensure that all permits contain correct and approved routings from both Civil Aviation Authorities (CAAs). Also, be aware that CAA Mongolia has specific lead times for landing permits along with documentation that needs to be submitted with the permit request:

The following is an overview of what you need to know:

1. Permit requirements

Overflight and landing permits are necessary for all private non-revenue and charter (non-scheduled commercial) operations to/over Mongolia. Official permit lead times range from two and 14 business days. At the very minimum two business days advance notification – not including weekends or holidays – is mandatory for any Mongolia permit. Normal CAA operating hours are Monday-Friday 0001-0900 UTC. While CAA is closed on weekends and holidays, an after-hours agent is available to deal with emergency permit requests. Be aware that Mongolia CAA will not issue any landing permit until you’ve confirmed ground handling arrangements.

2. A local business contact is required

For all landing permits requests a local business contact, familiar with your planned operation, must be provided to CAA. Required information that must be submitted to CAA, before a landing permit will be processed, includes contact name, company, title, address/phone/fax/email.

3. Landing permit documentation

Documentation required for Mongolia landing permits include:

  • certificates of airworthiness and registration
  • worldwide liability insurance (policy must be onboard)
  • Air Operator Certificate (for charter operators)
  • aircraft noise certificate
  • radio station license
  • pilot licenses and current medicals
  • confirmation of aircraft RVSM certification, GPWS equipment and ACAS II/TCAS II equipment

It’s important to ensure that your trip support provider has updated copies on file of all your aircraft and crew documentation. This will help avoid any preventable operating delays and/or operational missteps.

4. Short notice permits

Special provisions are allowed for short notice permits, but only in cases of air ambulance and emergency flights. Your request should be submitted one full business day in advance, and a 15% surcharge will be added to navigation fees by CAA. In some cases, emergency overflight and landing permits may be possible with just two hours’ notice, assuming all required information/documentation accompanies your emergency permit request.

5. Permit revisions

Permit revisions must, in most cases, be sent to CAA at least 72 hours prior to the date of operations. If your schedule changes to a later period, within the 72 hour permit window, only a notification is needed, and your permit number remains the same. Notification is also required for crew/passenger changes, and your permit number does not change. However, for earlier operations you’ll need to submit a revision request, and a new permit number may be issued. Likewise, for aircraft registration, routing or origin/destination changes, revision requests must be submitted, and new permit numbers may be issued. In the case of routing changes, outside Mongolia’s FIR, no notification is required, assuming your origin/destination remains the same.

6. Permit revision limitations

Be aware that CAA only allows operators a maximum of two permit revisions. If you request a third permit change, this kicks in a requirement for a new permit. When operating to/within Mongolia it’s best to try to stay with your approved schedule as multiple permit revisions have the potential to significantly delay your operations and schedule.

Conclusion

When operating to or over Mongolia be mindful of permit and ground handling lead times, along with requirements for local business contact details. Your trip support provider will assist in ensuring documentation compliance for your upcoming Mongolian trip.

Questions?

If you have any questions about this article or would like assistance planning your next trip to Mongolia, contact me at toddcarter@univ-wea.com.

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Master Mission Advisor Todd Carter has been with Universal since 2001 and has facilitated well over 20,000 client flight legs since then. An FAA-licensed aircraft dispatcher and certified flight instructor, Todd earned a Bachelor of Science degree in aviation from Indiana State University and has experience flying both King Airs and Cessna Citations. He has a keen eye for flight planning detail and enjoys putting together trips to meet all the success objectives of operators. International trip planning can be a complex process, but Todd thrives – with patience and accuracy – in this often high-pressure environment, using his knowledge of trip support to seamlessly handle all of the day-to-day challenges inherent in international operations. He can be reached at toddcarter@univ-wea.com.

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