BizAv Security Planning for the 2016 Brazil Game – Part 2: Security Briefs and Executive Protection

> | July 11, 2016 | 0 Comments
|

BizAv Security Planning for the 2016 Brazil Game – Part 2: Security Briefs and Executive Protection
This business aviation blog post continues from our article last week, entitled “BizAv Security Planning for the 2016 Brazil Summer Games – Part 1: Risk Assessment.

Effectively mitigating security risks for travel to the 2016 Brazil Summer Games (August 5-September 18) involves recognizing potential risks and threats well prior to day of operation. It’s suggested that operators undertake rigorous assessments of what passengers and crew will be doing on the ground in Brazil and take advantage of good quality pre-trip security intelligence information.

The following is an overview of what you need to know:

1. Security briefs

Pre-trip security briefs are recommended if you’ve not been to a location before or if it’s been some time since you were last there. Security briefs help provide first-hand knowledge on risks and threat mitigation from reliable sources. Several different types of briefs are available – from country, city, airport, hotel, and on the ground route briefs. Ideally, it’s best to try to customize security intelligence to your type of flight, purpose of trip, particular risk profiles, and specific requirements of your passengers.

2. Some briefs are more in-depth than others

While many providers can supply general security assessments, some security briefs are better than others, in terms of depth of analysis and relevance to your mission. Are your passengers in higher risk categories, are you staying in areas a little off the beaten path and are you attending local events in various different venues? Security briefs tailored to your particular operation may be the better choice, although they likely involve a higher cost. These more in depth briefs will give you a better idea of potential risk mitigation measures, such as hiring an executive protection provider to visit the area, prior to your arrival, to better mitigate risk facets of your planned trip.

3.Lead times

Obtain area security briefs as soon as you’re aware of a planned international trip, even if schedule is still tentative. These will provide you with general threat considerations, related to what passengers and crew will be doing on the ground, along with hotel and on the ground route insights. Closer to day of operation we recommend following up with additional, current, security intelligence on possible road closures, local protests and/or planned political events, and specific threats/risks associated with the venues you’ll be visiting.

4. Executive protection options

Executive protection services for passengers and crew are choices many flight departments are considering for the Summer Games. Options include both armed and unarmed security services and really depend on your corporate and executive risk profiles as well as flight department standard operating procedures (SOPs). For example, if crews are staying at out-of-popular-area hotels, with long drive times, executive protection may be recommended. For the highest level of executive protection and coverage, it’s best to have security agents at your venue a day or two before you arrive to review hotel security, transport routes, and local meeting venues. And, don’t forget to arrange tickets at the games you’re attending for your executive protection agent or you’ll be more exposed during these event times.

5. Costs of executive protection

Executive protection costs vary greatly as there are many different levels of protection available. Costs will, of course, be higher if you arrange to have these resources on the ground prior to your arrival, and there may be travel costs to consider if agents have to be re-positioned to the location. We recommend obtaining cost quotes in advance, and most security providers do not charge for these quotes. If cost is a factor, consider unarmed protection agents or even contracting a local tour guide to accompany you. While local tour guides are not security professionals, they’ll speak the language, know the area, and provide another set of eyes to look out for you.

6. Additional Reading

See our previous articles covering best practices for business aviation security planning.

Conclusion

Well prior to traveling to the 2016 Brazil Summer Games it’s important that operators be aware of all relevant security risks and have risk mitigation plans in place. Pre-trip security briefs can be invaluable planning considerations, helping you avoid potential risk scenarios. And, while on the ground during the Summer Games, it’s always important to be aware of your surroundings and to not become too distracted.

Questions?

If you have any questions about this article or would like assistance arranging security for your upcoming trip, contact me at traciecarwile@univ-wea.com.

“Introducing
|

Tags: , , , , ,

Category : Best Practice, Events

Related Posts

About

Security Services Rep Tracie Carwile is one of the general aviation (GA) industry’s go-to experts when it comes domestic and international security intelligence, hotel and ground transport safety, and crew security training. Over her 10 years in the industry, Tracie has developed an extensive background in all areas of flight operations and logistics – working with Universal as a Sales Assistant, UVair Sales – New Business Development and Senior Client Relations Specialist. Known for her ability to lever Universal’s global network to implement last-minute security services worldwide, Tracie often handles security services for VVIPs, heads of state, and entertainers, with operational confidentiality always a paramount consideration. She assists individual flight departments in developing/amending corporate travel safety guidelines and travels nationwide to provide customized security training for flight crew members, including flight attendants. Tracie has been quoted in various publications – including Professional Pilot and NBAA publications – and can be reached at traciecarwile@univ-wea.com.

Operational Insight is a moderated blog.
Before adding your comments, please read our Comment Policy.