New Chinese ADIZ Over the East China Sea: Impact on Business Aviation

> | December 17, 2013 | 0 Comments
|

New Chinese ADIZ Over the East China Sea: Impact on Business Aviation

China’s recent establishment of an Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) over the East China Sea is attracting attention and causing confusion among business aircraft operators around the world. An ADIZ is an airspace area over water or land where identification, location, and control of aircraft are required in the interests of national security. Many countries – including India, Japan, the UK, and China – have areas like these.

The following is an overview of what you need to know about these changes:

1. Latest news regarding the new Chinese ADIZ

On November 23, 2013, China unilaterally declared a new ADIZ. This new area covers a region over the East China Sea and includes airspace within the Fukuoka Flight Information Region (FIR) (Japan), Incheon FIR (South Korea), and Taipei FIR (Taiwan). This new ADIZ also includes a group of islands that both China and Japan claim. The Chinese government refers to the islands as the "Diaoyu Islands," while the Japanese government refers to them as the "Senkaku Islands." Note that Taiwan also lays claim to the islands. Please see the diagram below from China’s Ministry of National Defense.

2. Flight planning considerations

This new ADIZ announcement has raised concerns regarding procedures and transit through the affected airspace. As noted below, China Air Traffic Control (ATC) is advised via flight plan messages sent to appropriate addresses that aircraft are crossing this airspace. At this time, there are no further requirements. If a new obligation– such as communicating with China ATC – arises, we will advise accordingly. So far, there have been no issues or incidents in regards to any general aviation or scheduled commercial aircraft.

Please note the following additional data regarding this new change:

  • At the present time, it is not necessary to avoid this airspace.
  • You may avoid this specific area if you like.
  • China ATC is being advised of aircraft traveling through this new ADIZ zone via flight plan messages sent to the necessary addresses that the aircraft are traversing through the airspace.

For operators who choose to avoid this area, please coordinate with your 3rd-party provider, as this may affect permits and require additional stops due to the additional distance added.

3. Additional information

To view the specific region this new ADIZ covers, please see notice posted on the Ministry of National Defense, The People’s Republic of China, website.

Conclusion

This newly claimed Chinese ADIZ seems to remain a work in progress. At this time, there’s a lack of clarity regarding required/recommended procedures and possible repercussions for non-compliance. We will provide operational updates as this situation evolves.

Questions?

If you have any questions about this article or flight planning in general, contact me at jasondavidson@univ-wea.com.

“Introducing
|

Tags: ,

Category : Best Practice

Related Posts

About

A lifelong aviation enthusiast with nearly 15 years in the field, pilot and flight instructor Jason Davidson is an expert in all areas of flight planning. Jason, who joined Universal Weather and Aviation, Inc. in 2005, has spent time on the Universal portfolio teams facilitating trips and providing quality assurance and project management duties to further improve systems within Universal. He currently serves as Flight Planning Technical Specialist, and plays a critical role in preparing the Flight Planning Team and clients for all aspects and changes regarding flight planning such as ICAO 2012. Jason has a Bachelor of Science degree in aviation from the University of North Dakota.

He can be reached at jasondavidson@univ-wea.com.

Operational Insight is a moderated blog.
Before adding your comments, please read our Comment Policy.