Business Aviation Trip Planning: 2013 Japan Formula 1 Grand Prix

> | September 24, 2013 | 2 Comments
|

Business Aviation Trip Planning: 2013 Japan Formula 1 Grand Prix

This is a post by author Hiroshi Higashiyama. Hiroshi is representative director for Universal Aviation Japan, which has aircraft ground handling facilities in Haneda, Narita, Sapporo and Osaka. Hiroshi is an expert on business aircraft operations in Japan and can be contacted at hiroshihigashiyama@universalaviation.aero.

The 2013 Japanese Formula 1 Grand Prix runs October 11-13 at the Suzuka circuit – about 50 km south of Nagoya. Designed in 1962 as a test track, the Suzuka circuit is one of the few race circuits in the world to have a figure eight layout. There are various airport options to consider for this exciting Grand Prix event. Your local ground handler or 3rd-party provider will be able to help coordinate all your services, including hotel accommodations and local transport options to the race circuit.

Here’s a general overview of what you should be aware of:

1. Primary airports to consider

There are three airports to consider for this event: Nagoya (RJGG), one hour from the track; Komaki (RJNA), a 1.5-hour drive; and Osaka (RJBB), 2.5 hours from the circuit. RJGG and RJNA are both Airports of Entry (AOEs), but RJNA is an AOE upon request. Due to increased traffic at these airports over the Formula 1 period, it’s recommended that aircraft parking, local transport and aircraft services be requested well in advance.
Also, Grand Prix attendees may charter a helicopter to avoid heavy traffic in the circuit area. Such transfers from RJGG, RJNA and RJBB to Suzuka take 15, 30 and 60 minutes, respectively.

Nagoya (RJGG)

  • Airport of entry (AOE): Yes
  • Operating hours: 24 hours
  • Prior Permission Required (PPR): Not required
  • Airport slots: Required
  • Aircraft parking: Available
  • Ground handling: Available
  • Aviation fuel (Jet A-1): Available
  • In-flight catering: Available

Notes:

This airport is primarily used for commercial flights.

Airport slots are required for all operations into RJGG. Lead time is at least 24 hours for a tech stop and three days if the aircraft conducts domestic flights. Airport slot deviation is +/- 30 minutes, and all confirmations are provided in UTC time.

Hangar space is available at this airport.

Stage 2 aircraft can’t operate to RJGG. All aircraft operating to Japan must be International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Stage 3 or above certified.

Komaki (RJNA)

  • AOE: Upon request
  • Operating hours: 0700-2200 local (see below)
  • PPR: Required for all aircraft (see below)
  • Airport slots: Required
  • Aircraft parking: Available
  • Ground handling: Available
  • Aviation fuel (Jet A-1): Available and aviation fuel cards accepted
  • In-flight catering: Available

Notes:

This is the old Nagoya airport and is dedicated primarily for general aviation and regional aircraft movements. This is an AOE upon request, and three days’ advance notice is required to make Customs, Immigration and Quarantine (CIQ) arrangements. Once confirmed, CIQ officers will handle the clearances inside the general aviation terminal.

International arrivals are permitted 0730-2100 local, while international departures are permitted 0830-2130 local.

No overtime is permitted at this airport.

PPRs are required for all aircraft traveling to this airport. Lead time for a pleasure trip or tech stop is 10 calendar days before the flight operation. For all business and charter (non-scheduled commercial) flights, the lead time is 24 hours before the flight operation.

Airport slots are required for all arrivals and departures. Lead time is a minimum of ten days in advance for a tech stop, and three days if the aircraft lands and stays for business purposes. Airport slot deviation is +/- 30 minutes, and confirmations are provided in UTC time.

Stage 2 aircraft can’t operate at this airport. All aircraft operating to Japan must be ICAO Stage 3 or above certified.

Osaka (RJBB)

  • AOE: Yes
  • Operating hours: 24 hours
  • Prior Permission Required (PPR): Not required
  • Airport slots: Required
  • Aircraft parking: Available
  • Ground handling: Available
  • Aviation fuel (Jet A-1): Available
  • In-flight catering: Available

Notes:

Only 40 airport slots are available per hour. As this is a busy airport, advanced lead time is recommended to request airport slots. Slot deviation is +/- 30 minutes, and all confirmations are provided in UTC time.

Stage 2 aircraft can’t operate at this airport. All aircraft operating to Japan must be ICAO Stage 3 or above certified.

2. Landing permits are needed for charter (non-scheduled commercial) and experimental flights

Landing permits are required for all charter flights into Japan, except tech stops or crew changes with no passengers embarking or disembarking. Landing permits are also required for private non-revenue flights if the aircraft is experimental, if it’s a non-ICAO-member aircraft, or if the aircraft is making domestic flights. Landing permits for domestic private non-revenue flights require three working days and a minimum of 24 hours before operation, if urgent. For charter flights, lead time is three working days in the case of tourism flights and three working days for business flights. For urgent short-notice charter requests, contact the Japan Civil Aviation Bureau (JCAB) at least one business day in advance. Approval of short-notice permit requests is at JCAB’s discretion.

3. Consider hotel and transport options

There are many excellent hotel options in the Nagoya and Osaka areas, including a wide selection of 4- and 5-star accommodations, including popular international chains. Due to increased traffic during this busy period, it’s recommended that hotels be booked as far in advance as possible.
Pre-paid transportation (car with driver) is suggested during the Japanese Grand Prix period. Rental vehicles are available at all three airports, but should be booked in advance due to high demand during this period. There is also public transportation available for this event. Specifically, there is a train named the "Suzuka F1" running between Nagoya station and the SuzukaIno station that takes approximately 40 minutes. If you decide to use the train, please take into account a 10-15 minute walk from the train station to the circuit.

4. Additional information

Additional information on the Japanese Formula 1 Grand Prix at Suzuka can be found at the Japanese Formula 1 website.

Closing thoughts

It’s best to begin working with your ground handler or 3rd-party provider, as soon as schedule is known, in order to secure the best operating options. Request airport slots and PPRs for aircraft parking as early as possible. Don’t forget to allow at least three business days to organize any required charter permits.

Questions?

If you have any questions about this article or operating to Japan, contact me at hiroshihigashiyama@universalaviation.aero.

“Introducing
|

Tags: , ,

Category : Best Practice, Events

Related Posts

About

Hiroshi “Higashi” Higashiyama, representative director of Universal Aviation Japan – Tokyo, has over 17 years of experience in the aviation industry in ground support and operations and is an expert on operating to Japan. Higashi’s expertise has earned him numerous invitations to speak both domestically and internationally at major industry events and conferences such as the National Business Aviation Association Conference. Higashi, who is based in Tokyo, along with the staff of Universal Aviation Japan – Tokyo, provided around-the-clock services for business aviation clients and humanitarian flights operating into Japan following the devastating earthquake and tsunami in 2011. He is also a member of the Japanese Business Aviation Association and works closely with local government officials to help improve business aviation infrastructure, processes, and procedures throughout Japan.

He can be reached at hiroshihigashiyama@universalaviation.aero.

Operational Insight is a moderated blog.
Before adding your comments, please read our Comment Policy.