Requesting Jet Fuel and Other BizAv Services in Ireland

> | July 11, 2013 | 2 Comments
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Requesting Jet Fuel and Other BizAv Services in Ireland

This is a post by author Derek Collins. Derek is general manager for Universal Aviation Shannon, which has an aircraft ground handling facility in Shannon, Ireland. Derek is an expert on business aircraft operations in Ireland and can be contacted at derekcollins@universalaviation.aero.

This business aviation blog post is part of a series on operating in Ireland and continues from our last article "Understanding Ground Handling at Ireland Airports."

For business aircraft operators, jet fuel prices in Ireland – particularly in Shannon (EINN) – are among the lowest in Europe. Service levels for fuel and additional services are excellent, and availability is good. Best practice is to take the time to confirm fuel uplifts, as well as 4th-party vendor services, 24 hours before your estimated time of arrival (ETA). Here is an overview of what you should know about requesting fueling and other 4th-party services in Ireland:

1. What’s the process for obtaining fuel in Ireland?

All fuel uplift requests should be made via e-mail to the fueler, and it’s important to check with your ground handler regarding fuel credit in advance. All fuel requests should have the aircraft information, schedule, liters to be uplifted and method of payment. Also, depending upon the airport, more than one fueler may be available.

2. What should I look out for in regards to jet fuel prices, charges and fees?

Fuelers in Ireland accept aviation fuel cards, fuel releases and oil company cards. Consumer credit cards and cash aren’t accepted as often. Posted fuel prices change daily, and opportunity for jet fuel tax exemption depends on your type of flight (private non-revenue or charter), your destination and the airport you use in Ireland. For private non-revenue flights with destinations outside the European Union (EU), no value added tax (VAT) – which is currently 13.5% in Ireland – is applied to jet fuel purchases. For charter flights, no fuel taxes are applied, regardless of destination.

3. Is hydrant fuel an option?

EINN is the only airport in Ireland with hydrant fuel, which is available 24/7. Large aircraft are automatically given the hydrant option. However, airport authorities prefer that smaller aircraft not use hydrant fuel, as using it will occupy stands for larger aircraft. Truck (aka "bowser") and hydrant (aka "pod") fuel price options are more or less the same. Quick turns – wheels down to wheels up – are possible in Ireland within 45 minutes.

Note: If you are not familiar with the term "hydrant fuel," see our glossary of aviation fuel terms.

4. What’s the process for inbound aircraft with regard to fueling?

Provide the fueler with your fuel release or aviation fuel card and confirm that your type of flight (private non-revenue or charter) and destination – within or outside the EU – have been correctly noted. No AVGAS or Prist fuel additives are available at EINN. If you require Prist at EINN, you’ll need to bring it with you and add it yourself.

5. What are ground transport considerations?

Airside drop off, but not pickup, is possible planeside, but only if the driver has appropriate permission to access the ramp. Permission can be obtained from the airport authority with ground handler assistance. Local taxis, in some cases, may be given ramp access permission. Ground transport may not access the ramp for aircraft arrivals but may enter airside for departure if the aircraft is under the Maximum Takeoff Weight (MTOW) of 45 tons. According to EU regulation, there’s no requirement for departure screening or passport control for departing aircraft under MTOW of 45 tons. Pre-paid transportation (car and driver) is the preferred local transport option, but taxi services are good, and rental car facilities are available at all major airports in Ireland.

6. Are in-flight caterers located at the airport?

All major airports in Ireland have on-airport in-flight catering options with catering menus available. Approved airport in-flight caterers have access to the air side, while other catering – from hotels and restaurants – can be dropped off with your ground handler and delivered to your aircraft. Liquid limitations of 100 ml for security do not apply to delivery of catering or food items.

Conclusion

Whether on a quick-turn tech stop in Ireland or a longer stay, business aircraft operators can expect top-quality fueling services and reasonable prices by EU standards. Planeside passenger dropoff is still available at this time, and catering is also readily available.

Questions?

If you have any questions about this article or need help arranging handling in Ireland, contact me at derekcollins@universalaviation.aero.

Later we’ll discuss customs and immigration procedures for Ireland and their impact on your trip.

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Category : Best Practice

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About

Derek Collins has more than a decade’s experience working in ground support in Ireland. He is an expert at providing ground handling services to business aircraft throughout Ireland. Based in Shannon, Ireland, Derek has unique expertise in the United States Customs and Border Protection’s pre-clearance facility at Shannon, which allows operators to pre-clear all U.S. Customs and proceed directly to a number of destinations within the U.S. A member of the Shannon Airport Operations Committee, Derek works closely with airport authorities and CBP as an advocate on behalf of business aviation operators traveling to Shannon or using Shannon as a tech stop.

Derek, who has a degree from the University of Limerick, can be reached at derekcollins@universalaviation.aero.

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